House Calls

WIN 2019

House Calls Magazine is a quarterly publication that focuses on health and wellness. It includes a wide assortment of articles with topics on the latest health and wellness information, nutrition, safety, lifestyles, and more.

Issue link: http://housecallsmagazine.rsfh.com/i/1067255

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 33 of 54

h o u s e c a l l s { winter 2019 } 29 WHEN & HOW TO SEEK HELP FOR OPIOID ADDICTION If you or someone you love is suffering from opioid addiction, you're not alone. Some of the most common mental and physical symptoms of opioid addiction include: • Uncharacteristic mood swings • Changes in sleep habits (sleeping more or less than normal) • Loss of interest/focus on normal activities • Inability to control urges to take the drug(s) • Inability to stop use despite negative impacts on relationships, health, or work • Increased tolerance for or dependence on drug(s) There are a number of local resources ready to help those with addiction. Roper St. Francis Healthcare offers a referral-based opioid reduction clinic with experts on hand to help people through opioid withdrawal and addiction. Charleston Center, Charleston County's substance abuse and treatment facility, offers a 24-hour helpline at (843) 722-0100. The Lowcountry is also home to a number of support groups for families or individuals in recovery, including the Greater Charleston Al-Anon group and the Charleston chapter of Narcotics Anonymous. Another excellent resource is the National Helpline at 1-800-662-4357 or ww.hhs.gov/opioids. "We've decreased the amount of narcotics used for bariatric patients while they're in the hospital by more than 95 percent." -DR. KENNETH MITCHELL "In 2010, this wasn't easy," says Dr. Frohock, who notes that the orthopedic department at Roper St. Francis has been using alternative methods for pain management for close to a decade. "People were skeptical. Patients were accustomed to being prescribed opioids and feared that forgoing them meant heightened pain," he says. But that dynamic has shifted. "It's not as hard anymore because everyone has been affected by the opioid epidemic in some way. Most everyone has a family member, a friend, or a friend of a friend who's been impacted by addiction."

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of House Calls - WIN 2019